Participants - For Love or Money?

 

 

 

ROUNDTABLE ORGANIZERS

Marion Crain

Marion Crain

ARM'S LENGTH INTIMACY: EMPLOYMENT AS RELATIONSHIP
Professor Crain's scholarship examines the relationship between gender, work and class status, with a particular emphasis on collective action.  Professor Crain has authored or coauthored over 25 law review articles and two book chapters.  She is the author of two textbooks, LABOR LAW: CASES AND MATERIALS (with Theodore St. Antoine and Charles Craver), and WORK LAW: CASES AND MATERIALS (with Pauline Kim and Mike Selmi), both published by Lexis Law Publishing.  She is a coeditor, together with Senator John Edwards and Professor Arne Kalleberg (UNC Sociology), of a commercial press book: Ending Poverty in America: How to Restore the American Dream (The New Press, 2007). [view profile]

 

Kimberly Krawiec

 

Kimberly Krawiec

Kimberly Krawiec is an expert on corporate law who teaches courses on securities, corporate, and derivatives law. Her research interests span a variety of fields, including the empirical analysis of contract disputes; the choice of organizational form by professional service firms, including law firms; forbidden or taboo markets; corporate compliance systems; insider trading; derivatives hedging practices; and “rogue” trading.

Prior to joining academia, Krawiec was a member of the Commodity & Derivatives Group at the New York office of Sullivan & Cromwell. She has served as a commentator for the Central European and Eurasian Law Initiative (CEELI) of the American Bar Association and on the faculty of the National Association of Securities Dealers Institute for Professional Development at the Wharton School of Business. She holds a juris doctorate from Georgetown University and a bachelor’s degree from North Carolina State University. [view profile]

AUTHORS

 

Susan Appleton

 

Susan Appleton

MONEY CAN'T BUY ME LOVE: SEX THERAPY IN THE AGE OF VIAGRA (co-author Susan Stiritz)
Susan Appleton, a nationally known expert on family law, has been a member of the Council of the American Law Institute since 1994 and has held the office of Secretary since 2004. She has served as an adviser for the ALI's Principles of the Law of Family Dissolution and as a consultant to the New Jersey Bioethics Commission, assisting that agency in its recommendations for laws addressing "surrogate-mother" arrangements. In 2004, she joined the Board of Directors of the American Bar Foundation, and in 2009, she became a member of the Advisory Committee on Private International Law for the United States Department of State, representing the Association of American Law Schools.  Appleton is the co-author of "Adoption and Assisted Reproduction:  Families Under Construction" and four editions of "Modern Family Law: Cases and Materials." Her recent publications also include "Parents by the Numbers," 37 Hofstra Law Review 11 (2008); "Toward a 'Culturally Cliterate' Family Law?," 23 Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice 267 (2008); "Gender, Abortion, and Travel After Roe's End," 51 St. Louis University Law Journal 655 (2007); "Presuming Women: Revisiting the Presumption of Legitimacy in the Same-Sex Couples Era," 86 Boston University Law Review 227 (2006). [view profile]

Mary Anne Case

 

Mary Ann Case

ENFORCING BARGAINS IN AN ONGOING MARRIAGE
A graduate of Yale College and the Harvard Law School, Mary Anne Case studied at the University of Munich, litigated for Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison in New York, and was the Class of 1966 Research Professor of Law at the University of Virginia before joining the Chicago faculty. She was a Visiting Professor of Law at the Law School in autumn of 1998 and at NYU during the 1996–97 academic year and the spring of 1999. In the spring of 2004, she was Bosch Public Policy Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. For the 2006–07 academic year she was the Crane Fellow in Law and Public Affairs at Princeton University. Among the subjects she teaches are feminist jurisprudence, constitutional law, European legal systems, marriage, and regulation of sexuality. While her diverse research interests include German contract law and the First Amendment, her scholarship to date has concentrated on the regulation of sex, gender, and sexuality, and on the early history of feminism.  [view profile]

Yuval Feldman

 

Yuval Feldman

THE COMPLEXITY OF DISENTANGLING INTRINSIC AND EXTRINSIC MOTIVATIONS: THEORETICAL AND EMPIRICAL INSIGHTS FROM THE BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS OF LAW
Yuval Feldman is a senior lecturer (with tenure) in the Faculty of Law at Bar-Ilan University, Israel, where he has served since 2004. He received a BA in Psychology and an LLB (1998) from Bar-Ilan University, and a PhD in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from UC Berkeley in 2004.  He clerked for the Supreme Court of Israel in 1998-1999.  His main research topics include: employment and labor law;  psychology and law; experimental law and economics; quantitative approaches to law and society; regulatory impact and social norms; formal and non-formal enforcement of the law; He has been the recipient of a number of fellowships and awards including Rothschild, Fulbright, Alon, Olin, and Zeltner for the young scientist. In addition, he has been awarded a number of competitive research grants to conduct large scale empirical projects, from foundations as the European Union (FP6), the Israeli Science Foundation (with Oren Perez), the Israeli Science Foundation (with Isaac Benbaji) the German-Israeli Foundation and the American Bar Association (with Orly Lobel).  His papers (mostly joint) were published in journals such as the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, Review of Law and Economics, NYU Law Review, Northwestern Law Review, Texas Law Review, Comparative Labor Law and Policy, J. Law and Society and Regulation and Governance. [view profile]

Julie Nelson

 

Julie Nelson

DOES PROFIT-SEEKING RULE OUT LOVE? EVIDENCE (OR NOT) FROM ECONOMICS AND LAW
Julie A. Nelson is a member of the Economics faculty at the University of Massachusetts Boston. A leader in the field of feminist economics, she has investigated gender-laden biases in the definition and methodology of economics, and the implications of these biases for the economics of care. Her recent works include  Economics for Humans (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2006) and "The Economics of Nursing: Articulating Care" (Feminist Economics, 2009, with Valerie Adams).

 

 

Larry Ribstein

 

Larry Ribstein

PARTNERSHIP VS. MARRIAGE
Professor Larry E. Ribstein is the Mildred Van Voorhis Jones Chair in Law. Professor Ribstein is the author of two recent books from Oxford University Press, The Law Market (with Erin O'Hara) and The Rise of the Uncorporation. His other books include The Sarbanes-Oxley Debacle and The Constitution and the Corporation (both with Henry Butler), The Economics of Federalism (with Kobayashi), and several casebooks and treatises on unincorporated business entities.  From 1998-2001 he was co-editor of the Supreme Court Economic Review.  Ribstein also has written or co-authored more than 140 articles on subjects including corporate, securities and partnership law, constitutional law, bankruptcy, film, the internet, family law, professional ethics and licensing, uniform laws, choice of law and jurisdictional competition. His blog focusing on business law is Ideoblog.

Laura Rosenbury

 

Laura Rosenbury

FRIENDS AT WORK
Professor Rosenbury’s research and teaching focuses on the law of everyday life: work, family, sex and death. She is particularly interested in how the law may influence seemingly private relationships and conduct. Her article “Between Home and School,” 155 U. Pa. L. Rev. 833 (2007), examines these issues in the context of childrearing. That article was selected for presentation at the 2006 Stanford/Yale Junior Faculty Forum as the best paper in the family law category. " Friends with Benefits?," 106 Mich. L. Rev. 189 (2007), explores the law's role in maintaining the divide between friends and family, asking why the law fails to recognize relationship between adults that do not center around sexual activity.  Her forthcoming article, "Sex In and Out of Intimacy," co-authored with Jennifer Rothman, conversely analyzes the law's treatment of sex outside of marriage - like relationships.  Professor Rosenbury joined the law school in the fall of 2002. In 2006 she was named the Professor of the Year. Before joining the faculty, she served as an associate in the litigation department at Davis Polk & Wardwell in New York and as an adjunct professor at Fordham University School of Law.   [view profile]

Kate Silbaugh

 

Kate Silbaugh

TESTING AS COMMODIFICATION
Katharine Silbaugh is widely recognized for her pioneering work on the legal response to women’s domestic labor. She is a leader in the emerging legal literature on the stresses of the work-family conflict. Her research highlights the economic and social value of work done within households, and the inadequacy of the legal response to that labor. Her work on the causes and possible solutions to tensions between paid work hours and family life break new ground.  Professor Silbaugh clerked for Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. She later collaborated with Posner on a survey of sexual regulation, A Guide to America’s Sex Laws, published by the University of Chicago Press and now in paperback. She also is the author of numerous journal articles including the “Commodification and Women’s Household Labor” for Yale Journal of Law and Feminism and “Turning Labor into Love: Housework and the Law” for Northwestern Law Review. She was the editor of The Structures of Carework published by the Chicago-Kent Law Review in 2001. Professor Silbaugh contributed to the plaintiffs case in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, the landmark Massachusetts case leading to the first court-approved same-sex marriages in 2004. [view profile]

Susan Stiritz

 

Susan Stiritz

MONEY CAN'T BUY ME LOVE: SEX THERAPY IN THE AGE OF VIAGRA (co-author Susan Appleton)
Susan Stiritz is a lecturer in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Washington University.  After graduating from a women’s college, I was disheartened to discover, when I entered the work force, that the outside world treated women as less competent, valued, and deserving than men. Working as a writer/photographer for St. Louis’s antipoverty agency, however, I also found exemplars of nonviolent resistance and community action, who demonstrated that a critical stance and hard work could redeem life in a bigoted society.  My intellectual interests have focused on issues of social justice ever since. While teaching Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies courses, I am also pursuing an MSW at the Brown School.  [view profile]

 

COMMENTATORS

 

Scott Baker

 

Scott Baker

Scott A. Baker is a prolific and widely-respected law and economics scholar. His research tackles a wide range of topics, from judicial performance to the structure of law firms to problems in patent law.  Before joining the Washington University Law faculty in 2009, Baker was a professor of law at the University of North Carolina since 2002, where he taught Law & Economics, Corporate Finance, Contracts, Torts, Property, and Intellectual Property. He served as UNC’s associate dean for faculty affairs from July to December 2007 and received the McCall Award for Law School Teacher of  the Year in 2005. He also held a courtesy appointment as professor of economics at UNC.  His research interests lie at the intersection of law, economics, and game theory. His co-authored work has appeared in the Journal of Law and Economics, the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, and numerous other law reviews. He is the recipient of a Tilburg University grant for studies in the law and economics of innovation.  Baker clerked for Judge E. Grady Jolly of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. [view profile]

William Bratton

 

William W. Bratton

William W. Bratton is the Peter P. Weidenbruch, Jr., Professor of Business Law at the Georgetown University Law Center and a Research Associate of the European Corporate Governance Institute.  Before joining the Georgetown law faculty, he was Samuel Tyler Research Professor at the George Washington University Law School, the Kaiser Professor of Law and Director of the Heyman Center on Corporate Governance at Cardozo Law School, and Professor of Law and Governor Woodrow Wilson Scholar at Rutgers Law School, Newark. He also has been the Unilever Visiting Professor at the Faculty of Law of the University of Leiden and a visiting professor at the Duke, Pennsylvania and Stanford law schools.  Before becoming an academic, Professor Bratton served as law clerk to Judge William H. Timbers of the Second Circuit United States Court of Appeals and practiced corporate law at Debevoise & Plimpton in New York. Professor Bratton is the author of Corporate Finance: Cases and Materials (Foundation Press), and the co-editor of an Oxford Press collection of essays on regulatory competition. He also has published many law review articles and book chapters on topics in corporate law, law and economics, and legal history.

Adrienne Davis

 

Adrienne Davis

Adrienne D. Davis is the William M. Van Cleve Professor of Law at Washington University Law School, where she teaches contracts, trusts & estates, and a variety of upper-level legal theory courses, including sex equality, law and literature, and slavery.  Her scholarship emphasizes the gendered and private law dimensions of American slavery. She also does work on feminist legal theory and conceptions of justice and reparations.  She is recipient of two grants from the Ford Foundation, the first to explore black women and labor, and the most recent administered through Brandeis University's Feminist Sexual Ethics Project to research women, slavery, sexuality, and religion.  In 2001 Davis was a resident fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study and Conference Center.  Davis is currently serving her second term as a Distinguished Lecturer with the Organization of American Historians. She is past chair of the Law and Humanities Section of the Association of American Law Schools and has been on the editorial boards of Law and History Review and Journal of Legal Education. She is the co-author of the book, Privilege Revealed: How Invisible Preference Undermines America (NYU Press), as well as numerous articles and book chapters.  Prior to joining the faculty in January 2008, Davis served as the Reef C. Ivey II Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina and was a professor and co-director of the Gender, Work & Family Project at Washington College of Law, American University.  Davis graduated from Yale College and Yale Law School and clerked for Judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. [view profile]

Robert Ellickson

 

Robert Ellickson

Robert C. Ellickson has been Walter E. Meyer Professor of Property and Urban Law at Yale Law School since 1988. He formerly was a member of the law faculties at Stanford and USC. His books include The Household: Informal Order Around the Hearth (2008); Order Without Law (1991) (awarded the Order of the Coif Triennial Book Award in 1996); and Perspectives on Property Law (3rd ed. 2002, with Carol M. Rose and Bruce A. Ackerman). He has published numerous articles in legal and public policy journals on topics such as social norms, land tenure, housing policy, and the organization of cities, community associations, and households. [view profile

 

 

Kieran Healy

 

Kieran Healy

Kieran Healy is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. He works in the areas of economic sociology, the sociology of culture and organizations. He is the author of "Last Best Gifts: Altruism and the Market for Human Blood and Organs" (Chicago). He is interested in the moral order of market society, the effect of quantification on the emergence and stabilization of social categories, and the link between these two topics.  [view profile]

 

 

 

Rebecca Hollander-Blumoff

 

Rebecca Hollander-Blumoff

Rebecca Hollander-Blumoff, an Associate Professor at Washington University School of Law, focuses on the intersection of law and psychology in the context of dispute resolution.  Her teaching, research and scholarship explore the relationship between human behavior and dispute resolution systems, particularly in the context of legal negotiation and civil procedure.  Her work has been published in Law & Social Inquiry, the Iowa Law Review, the Harvard Negotiation Law Review, and International Negotiation.  Her article, “Just Negotiation,” was selected for presentation at the 2009 Stanford-Yale Junior Faculty Forum.  She is currently a member of the Executive Committee of the AALS Section on Civil Procedure.  Professor Hollander-Blumoff joined the Washington University School of Law faculty in July 2006 from New York University School of Law, where she was a research fellow at the Institute of Judicial Administration.  Prior to her fellowship, she served for three years as an Acting Assistant Professor at New York University School of Law, where she taught basic jurisprudence, legal research and writing, interactive skills and oral advocacy in the Lawyering Program.  Professor Hollander-Blumoff also previously taught negotiation at Seton Hall University School of Law.  [view profile]

Ethan Leib

 

Ethan Leib

Ethan J Leib is a professor at the University of California's Hastings College of the Law.  He earned a JD from Yale Law School, an MPhil from the University of Cambridge, and a PhD in Political Science from Yale University.  Much of his recent research in private law is about the institution of friendship and whether the law is at all relevant in promoting or undermining it.  He has published articles on the subject in the UCLA Law Review, the Washington University Law Review, Emory Law Journal, and Policy Review.  His book on the subject -- Friend v. Friend: Friendships and What, If Anything, the Law Should Do About Them -- is forthcoming from Oxford University Press in 2010. 

 

 

Robert Pollak

 

Robert Pollak 

Professor Pollak's research interests include the economics of the family and demography as well as consumer demand analysis, environmental policy, and the theory of the cost-of-living index.  He is a prolific author and selected publications include:  The Theory of the Cost-of-Living Index, Oxford University Press, 1989; Demand System Specification and Estimation, (joint with Terence J. Wales), Oxford University Press, 1992; From Parent to Child: Intrahousehold Allocations and Intergenerational Relations in the United States, (joint with Jere R. Behrman and Paul Taubman), University of Chicago Press, 1995; "Why are Power Couples Increasingly Concentrated in Large Cities?" (joint with Janice Compton), NBER Working Paper 10918, November 2004; and "Bargaining Power in Marriage: Earning, Wage Rates and Household Production," NBER Working Paper 11239, March 2005.  

 

Washington University Law • Center for Interdisciplinary Studies
Marion Crain, Wiley B. Rutledge Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies
Shelly Henderson-Ford, Administrative Coordinator
T: 314.935.7988 · F: 314.935.7961 · Website