Corporate and Business Law

Washington University School of Law offers a wide array of courses in corporate and business law. Faculty members have also written major law review articles, casebooks, and treatises in the fields of corporations, securities law, white collar crime, and contracts.

Courses and Scholarship

The law school offers basic and advanced corporate and business law courses for upper-level students, including Corporations, Securities Regulation, Business Acquisitions, and Corporate Finance. The courses are taught by nationally-recognized Professors Adam Badawi, Charles Burson, Hillary Sale, and Andrew Tuch, as well as by practicing lawyers. Professor John Drobak offers related courses in Corporate and White Collar Crime and Antitrust, respectively. Professors Adam Rosenzweig and Melissa Waters teach courses on International Business Transactions. For more information on course selection, click on Course Information and Directory.

In addition to the courses taught by the full-time faculty, the law school provides students with exciting opportunities to learn from experts in the field.  As part of the law school’s clinical program, students have the ability to work in the chambers of Justice Randy Holland of the Delaware Supreme Court.  Justice Holland, an adjunct member of the faculty, also teaches an intensive weekend course at the law school on Corporate Governance and Control.  Former member of the Delaware Court of Chancery and current partner at the law firm Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, P.C., William Chandler III, teaches a related course on Problems in Corporate Law.  Eileen Kamerick, Managing Director and Chief Financial Officer of the international investment bank Houlihan Lokey, and Matthew Kitzi, Missouri Commissioner of Securities, also teach courses at the law school.

Faculty members also produce some of the most influential scholarship in the field. Professor Sale is the co-author with John C. Coffee of the leading casebook on securities regulation, now in its 11th edition, and of a book on federal securities laws, rules, and forms. Two of her law review articles were selected by Corporate Practice Commentator as among the annual “top ten” corporate and securities law articles of the year. She has written extensively on SEC reform, the role of corporate directors, and securities and derivative litigation. Professor Tuch is a highly accomplished corporate law scholar who currently studies regulatory strategies for controlling conflicts of interest in large financial institutions. His article, "Multiple Gatekeepers," was among the "top ten" corporate and securities law articles of 2011. Professor Badawi is an expert on franchising and its relationship to corporate and contract law. His article, “Relational Governance and Contract Damages: Evidence from Franchising,” was recently published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Empirical Legal Studies. Professor Brickey’s three-volume treatise on corporate criminal liability and her casebook on white collar crime are the leading works in the field.

Other Opportunities

Upper-level students interested in corporate and business law also have opportunities to gain practical knowledge outside of the classroom, including through an externship with the Securities and Exchange Commission, through the law school’s Congressional and Administrative Law Externship, and an externship on Wall Street, through the New York City Regulatory & Business Externship. Students may also go beyond the J.D. program, pursuing the Joint J.D.-M.B.A. Program affiliated with the university’s prestigious Olin School of Business; LL.M. degrees in Taxation or Intellectual Property; or the Certificate in Finance & Accounting. Finally, students may participate in the F. Hodge-O’Neil Symposium on Corporate and Securities Law sponsored by the Washington University Law Review.

Related Subjects

Students interested in corporate and business law may also benefit from courses in the areas of Bankruptcy, Commercial & Consumer Law, Employment and Labor Law, and Taxation.